Transportation Master Plan

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Cleveland Avenue in Squamish with vehicles driving down the street, pedestrians using sidewalks and a crosswalk, and cyclists travelling down the road.


The District of Squamish is developing a new Transportation Master Plan to identify issues with the current transportation network. It will also plan for future growth, and consider bigger picture outcomes including emissions, community and individual health, neighbourhood connectivity, transportation choice, and equity. All modes of transportation will be considered: walking, cycling, rolling (i.e. skateboard/scooter), taking the bus, driving a car, as well as trucks and commercial transportation.

When the plan is complete the District will have an updated list of recommended transportation infrastructure improvements and a roadmap to complete these capital projects! Input from the community will help us understand how to improve access to different transportation choices by providing:

  • Safe and comfortable active transportation networks for people who walk, wheel, and cycle;
  • An accessible, affordable, and efficient transit system; and
  • Appropriate road network improvements with a focus on safety and connectivity.

Project Update:

Thank you to everyone who participated in the first phase of the District's Transportation Master Plan project. From November 21, 2022 - January 18, 2023 we heard from more than 800 people who shared their transportation experiences and ideas to help develop a safe, efficient, and balanced transportation system that meets the needs of our entire community.

Click here to see what we heard during the first phase of the Transportation Master Plan project.


Next Steps

The project team is refining the draft Transportation Master Plan and preparing for community engagement later in the spring and early summer. We look forward to hearing from you on the recommendations in the plan.

Cleveland Avenue in Squamish with vehicles driving down the street, pedestrians using sidewalks and a crosswalk, and cyclists travelling down the road.


The District of Squamish is developing a new Transportation Master Plan to identify issues with the current transportation network. It will also plan for future growth, and consider bigger picture outcomes including emissions, community and individual health, neighbourhood connectivity, transportation choice, and equity. All modes of transportation will be considered: walking, cycling, rolling (i.e. skateboard/scooter), taking the bus, driving a car, as well as trucks and commercial transportation.

When the plan is complete the District will have an updated list of recommended transportation infrastructure improvements and a roadmap to complete these capital projects! Input from the community will help us understand how to improve access to different transportation choices by providing:

  • Safe and comfortable active transportation networks for people who walk, wheel, and cycle;
  • An accessible, affordable, and efficient transit system; and
  • Appropriate road network improvements with a focus on safety and connectivity.

Project Update:

Thank you to everyone who participated in the first phase of the District's Transportation Master Plan project. From November 21, 2022 - January 18, 2023 we heard from more than 800 people who shared their transportation experiences and ideas to help develop a safe, efficient, and balanced transportation system that meets the needs of our entire community.

Click here to see what we heard during the first phase of the Transportation Master Plan project.


Next Steps

The project team is refining the draft Transportation Master Plan and preparing for community engagement later in the spring and early summer. We look forward to hearing from you on the recommendations in the plan.

Do you have a question about the Transportation Master Plan?

Do you have a question about this project? Please ask us here.

  • Your question will be public once we have answered it. If your question contains personal information we may not make your question public and may respond privately. 
  • Your username and question may appear in reports to Council as part of engagement reporting.
  • Questions that do not contribute to a safe and respectful space for others, or are unrelated to this topic, will not be answered. Please review our moderation policy.
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  • Share What about a pedestrian/cyclist bridge from downtown to the new development east of downtown? This would connect the mostly isolated Valleycliffe neighbourhood to downtown reducing car dependency & solving the incomplete bike infrastructure attempt along the highway. In addition, during weekends, summer, and other busy times of highway congestion, this could alleviate traffic for Valleycliffe/Northridge locals to get to & from home by not depending on the highway as their ONLY form of movement. The current option has multiple dangerous merge turns with priority given to cars, poor lighting, & unsafe blind spot corners. Cars don't stop & this discourages the current generation to make their own necessary changes including getting the next generation making healthier habits. on Facebook Share What about a pedestrian/cyclist bridge from downtown to the new development east of downtown? This would connect the mostly isolated Valleycliffe neighbourhood to downtown reducing car dependency & solving the incomplete bike infrastructure attempt along the highway. In addition, during weekends, summer, and other busy times of highway congestion, this could alleviate traffic for Valleycliffe/Northridge locals to get to & from home by not depending on the highway as their ONLY form of movement. The current option has multiple dangerous merge turns with priority given to cars, poor lighting, & unsafe blind spot corners. Cars don't stop & this discourages the current generation to make their own necessary changes including getting the next generation making healthier habits. on Twitter Share What about a pedestrian/cyclist bridge from downtown to the new development east of downtown? This would connect the mostly isolated Valleycliffe neighbourhood to downtown reducing car dependency & solving the incomplete bike infrastructure attempt along the highway. In addition, during weekends, summer, and other busy times of highway congestion, this could alleviate traffic for Valleycliffe/Northridge locals to get to & from home by not depending on the highway as their ONLY form of movement. The current option has multiple dangerous merge turns with priority given to cars, poor lighting, & unsafe blind spot corners. Cars don't stop & this discourages the current generation to make their own necessary changes including getting the next generation making healthier habits. on Linkedin Email What about a pedestrian/cyclist bridge from downtown to the new development east of downtown? This would connect the mostly isolated Valleycliffe neighbourhood to downtown reducing car dependency & solving the incomplete bike infrastructure attempt along the highway. In addition, during weekends, summer, and other busy times of highway congestion, this could alleviate traffic for Valleycliffe/Northridge locals to get to & from home by not depending on the highway as their ONLY form of movement. The current option has multiple dangerous merge turns with priority given to cars, poor lighting, & unsafe blind spot corners. Cars don't stop & this discourages the current generation to make their own necessary changes including getting the next generation making healthier habits. link

    What about a pedestrian/cyclist bridge from downtown to the new development east of downtown? This would connect the mostly isolated Valleycliffe neighbourhood to downtown reducing car dependency & solving the incomplete bike infrastructure attempt along the highway. In addition, during weekends, summer, and other busy times of highway congestion, this could alleviate traffic for Valleycliffe/Northridge locals to get to & from home by not depending on the highway as their ONLY form of movement. The current option has multiple dangerous merge turns with priority given to cars, poor lighting, & unsafe blind spot corners. Cars don't stop & this discourages the current generation to make their own necessary changes including getting the next generation making healthier habits.

    Grant asked 8 months ago

    Hi! Thanks for your comment.

    In 2017, Council approved a pedestrian lift bridge for the Waterfront Landing development (also known as SEAandSKY) which will provide broad benefits to the residents of Squamish who live in neighbourhoods at the southern end of town, as well as to Downtown residents and visitors providing access to the new waterfront park. The pedestrian lift bridge will connect both sides of the Mamquam Blind Channel at Victoria Street.

    The pedestrian bridge will provide an important active transportation link for residents of Waterfront Landing, Valleycliffe, Hospital Hill, the St'a7mes community, and Downtown Squamish, creating more opportunities to walk and cycle to/from Downtown Squamish and further reduce the reliance on vehicle use. The Corridor Trail connects to the new Clarke Drive bridge west of Highway 99, which will then easily connect to Downtown via this pedestrian bridge.

    The Mamquam Blind Channel Pedestrian Bridge is currently awaiting final project approvals prior to construction. Updates to come. 

  • Share The District spent a considerable amount of money last year working around the perimeter of the roundabout on The Boulevard at Highlands Way South making improvements to the cycling network. No improvements were made to the roundabout itself why. The roundabout itself needs the centre area curb removed to allow dump trucks and the likes access to manoeuvre the roundabout. The area’s between the curbs, walkways and cycle path need the topsoil removed and replaced with pavers, concrete or asphalt paving. The truck drivers have no choice but to drive through some of them landscaping making a mess of it. This is also unnecessary work for Public Works or Parks staff to help continually have to maintain and taxpayers $$$. on Facebook Share The District spent a considerable amount of money last year working around the perimeter of the roundabout on The Boulevard at Highlands Way South making improvements to the cycling network. No improvements were made to the roundabout itself why. The roundabout itself needs the centre area curb removed to allow dump trucks and the likes access to manoeuvre the roundabout. The area’s between the curbs, walkways and cycle path need the topsoil removed and replaced with pavers, concrete or asphalt paving. The truck drivers have no choice but to drive through some of them landscaping making a mess of it. This is also unnecessary work for Public Works or Parks staff to help continually have to maintain and taxpayers $$$. on Twitter Share The District spent a considerable amount of money last year working around the perimeter of the roundabout on The Boulevard at Highlands Way South making improvements to the cycling network. No improvements were made to the roundabout itself why. The roundabout itself needs the centre area curb removed to allow dump trucks and the likes access to manoeuvre the roundabout. The area’s between the curbs, walkways and cycle path need the topsoil removed and replaced with pavers, concrete or asphalt paving. The truck drivers have no choice but to drive through some of them landscaping making a mess of it. This is also unnecessary work for Public Works or Parks staff to help continually have to maintain and taxpayers $$$. on Linkedin Email The District spent a considerable amount of money last year working around the perimeter of the roundabout on The Boulevard at Highlands Way South making improvements to the cycling network. No improvements were made to the roundabout itself why. The roundabout itself needs the centre area curb removed to allow dump trucks and the likes access to manoeuvre the roundabout. The area’s between the curbs, walkways and cycle path need the topsoil removed and replaced with pavers, concrete or asphalt paving. The truck drivers have no choice but to drive through some of them landscaping making a mess of it. This is also unnecessary work for Public Works or Parks staff to help continually have to maintain and taxpayers $$$. link

    The District spent a considerable amount of money last year working around the perimeter of the roundabout on The Boulevard at Highlands Way South making improvements to the cycling network. No improvements were made to the roundabout itself why. The roundabout itself needs the centre area curb removed to allow dump trucks and the likes access to manoeuvre the roundabout. The area’s between the curbs, walkways and cycle path need the topsoil removed and replaced with pavers, concrete or asphalt paving. The truck drivers have no choice but to drive through some of them landscaping making a mess of it. This is also unnecessary work for Public Works or Parks staff to help continually have to maintain and taxpayers $$$.

    joyrick asked over 1 year ago

    Hi there and thank you for reaching out with this question. At this time, the District has no plans to replace the centre of the roundabout with pavers or asphalt. The closure of the Mamquam Ring Road has forced more trucks to use the roundabout than normal. Repairs to the Mamquam Ring Road are expected to be complete this spring. Once repairs are finished, trucks will again be able to use that route. Fewer trucks will use the roundabout which should reduce damage to the landscaping in the centre and the amount of maintenance that is required. 

  • Share I reside in Furry Creek and received your card for input. Why is Furry Creek not included in the transportation master plan ? Everyone living here mainly uses and helps the local businesses in Squamish. If I am not mistaken a chunk of our property tax dollars goes to the upkeep of the community swimming pool in Squamish (which most living in Furry Creek do not use) on Facebook Share I reside in Furry Creek and received your card for input. Why is Furry Creek not included in the transportation master plan ? Everyone living here mainly uses and helps the local businesses in Squamish. If I am not mistaken a chunk of our property tax dollars goes to the upkeep of the community swimming pool in Squamish (which most living in Furry Creek do not use) on Twitter Share I reside in Furry Creek and received your card for input. Why is Furry Creek not included in the transportation master plan ? Everyone living here mainly uses and helps the local businesses in Squamish. If I am not mistaken a chunk of our property tax dollars goes to the upkeep of the community swimming pool in Squamish (which most living in Furry Creek do not use) on Linkedin Email I reside in Furry Creek and received your card for input. Why is Furry Creek not included in the transportation master plan ? Everyone living here mainly uses and helps the local businesses in Squamish. If I am not mistaken a chunk of our property tax dollars goes to the upkeep of the community swimming pool in Squamish (which most living in Furry Creek do not use) link

    I reside in Furry Creek and received your card for input. Why is Furry Creek not included in the transportation master plan ? Everyone living here mainly uses and helps the local businesses in Squamish. If I am not mistaken a chunk of our property tax dollars goes to the upkeep of the community swimming pool in Squamish (which most living in Furry Creek do not use)

    RN asked over 1 year ago

    Hi there and thank you for reaching out with this question. Furry Creek is not within the boundary of the District of Squamish and therefore is not included in the Transportation Master Plan. The District of Squamish, as a local government, is only able to direct transportation policy and projects within the District’s boundaries. 

    We recognize that it is not only residents of the District of Squamish who rely on the transportation network in town. We encourage everyone who moves around Squamish to complete the survey. There are questions in the survey to identify which community you live in, recognizing that people living in different areas may have different transportation needs and experiences. 

    As well, we hope you will use the mapping tool on this page show us where there are transportation challenges in Squamish that you are aware of. Again, this tool can be used by anyone who moves around Squamish on a regular basis.

Page last updated: 05 Mar 2024, 01:18 PM