Garibaldi Estates Neighbourhood Plan

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The District of Squamish is developing a neighbourhood plan for the Garibaldi Estates. The goal for the neighbourhood plan is to develop a vision for the future of the Garibaldi Estates over the next 20 years that supports a diversity of housing options, employment space, transportation, and community amenities.

Squamish’s 2040 Official Community Plan (OCP) outlines the future vision for Squamish. The OCP identifies the Garibaldi Estates as a priority area for a neighbourhood plan since it has opportunities to increase housing diversity and can support infill housing. It is also located near a major commercial hub in the Garibaldi Village, close to the highway and the core transit network, and has a lower flood risk relative to other areas of town.

There have been no land use scenarios developed for the Garibaldi Estates. This process will help to determine which types of infill housing might be appropriate for the neighbourhood and in which areas they might be a good fit.

We want to hear from Squamish residents to create a plan that is a good fit for the neighbourhood, improves the livability of the area, and supports larger community goals outlined in the OCP. Please complete a survey, ask us a question, or share your ideas using the engagement tools below.

Stage 3 Land Use Scenario Development

District staff are currently working to develop future neighbourhood scenarios for the Garibaldi Estates based on all input received since fall 2021. Development of scenarios is expected to take place between May and December 2022 and will be presented to the public for input once prepared.

Stage 3 Small Group Conversations

Stage three of engagement began with a goal to further explore ideas, concerns, opportunities and shared values through dialogue. The focus has been to engage segments of the Squamish population whose voices have been under-represented in stage two, including youth, seniors, employers and renters.

Small group conversations of between 10 to 12 people were held during April and May 2022. A Discussion Guide was used to structure the conversations, the guide can be found at these links:

The Engagement Summary and Report to Council for this component of the planning process:

In addition to the Small Group Conversations, two reports were presented to Council in May 2022: a transportation study and a report from the Squamish Food Policy Council. These can be found here:

Stage 2 Engagement Summary: Fall 2021

Please find a summary of what District staff and Council heard during the Fall 2021 engagement period here

Staff presented an update on the engagement to Council on January 11, 2022. You can watch a recording of the presentation and the Council discussion here by selecting the January 11, Committee of the Whole from the drop down menu.


The District of Squamish is developing a neighbourhood plan for the Garibaldi Estates. The goal for the neighbourhood plan is to develop a vision for the future of the Garibaldi Estates over the next 20 years that supports a diversity of housing options, employment space, transportation, and community amenities.

Squamish’s 2040 Official Community Plan (OCP) outlines the future vision for Squamish. The OCP identifies the Garibaldi Estates as a priority area for a neighbourhood plan since it has opportunities to increase housing diversity and can support infill housing. It is also located near a major commercial hub in the Garibaldi Village, close to the highway and the core transit network, and has a lower flood risk relative to other areas of town.

There have been no land use scenarios developed for the Garibaldi Estates. This process will help to determine which types of infill housing might be appropriate for the neighbourhood and in which areas they might be a good fit.

We want to hear from Squamish residents to create a plan that is a good fit for the neighbourhood, improves the livability of the area, and supports larger community goals outlined in the OCP. Please complete a survey, ask us a question, or share your ideas using the engagement tools below.

Stage 3 Land Use Scenario Development

District staff are currently working to develop future neighbourhood scenarios for the Garibaldi Estates based on all input received since fall 2021. Development of scenarios is expected to take place between May and December 2022 and will be presented to the public for input once prepared.

Stage 3 Small Group Conversations

Stage three of engagement began with a goal to further explore ideas, concerns, opportunities and shared values through dialogue. The focus has been to engage segments of the Squamish population whose voices have been under-represented in stage two, including youth, seniors, employers and renters.

Small group conversations of between 10 to 12 people were held during April and May 2022. A Discussion Guide was used to structure the conversations, the guide can be found at these links:

The Engagement Summary and Report to Council for this component of the planning process:

In addition to the Small Group Conversations, two reports were presented to Council in May 2022: a transportation study and a report from the Squamish Food Policy Council. These can be found here:

Stage 2 Engagement Summary: Fall 2021

Please find a summary of what District staff and Council heard during the Fall 2021 engagement period here

Staff presented an update on the engagement to Council on January 11, 2022. You can watch a recording of the presentation and the Council discussion here by selecting the January 11, Committee of the Whole from the drop down menu.

  • Housing Background: The Missing Middle

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    The District of Squamish Official Community Plan includes specific policy regarding the Garibaldi Estates neighbourhood planning process that supports providing opportunities for increased housing diversity along with infill development near the Garibaldi Village Commercial area. The intention is to increase housing choices so that a broader range of community residents can find suitable housing within the Garibaldi Estates neighbourhood.

    A key strategy to increasing housing diversity is to support missing middle housing forms. Missing middle housing is an urban planning concept which focuses on the gap in housing between single family dwellings and apartment buildings.

    What is Missing Middle?

    Missing Middle is a range of multi-unit or clustered housing types compatible in scale with single-family homes that help meet the growing demand for walkable urban living. Missing middle housing types include: duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, multiplexes, townhouses, row Housing, cottage clusters and courtyards apartments. These building types provide diverse housing options and support locally-serving retail and public transportation options. We call them “Missing” because they have typically been illegal to build in many areas due to zoning regulations and “Middle” because they sit in the middle of a spectrum between detached single-family homes and mid-rise to high-rise apartment buildings, in terms of form and scale, as well as number of units and often, affordability. In the diagram below, the Missing Middle types are shown in yellow, providing many housing options in between the single-family homes and higher intensity apartment buildings, both shown in white.

    https://missingmiddlehousing.com/

    While many of these forms are “missing” from our current building stock, these types of buildings from the 1920s and 30s are beloved by many who have lived in them. Today the elderly, young couples, teachers, single, professional women and baby boomers are among those looking for ways to live in a walkable neighborhood, but without the cost and maintenance burden of a detached single-family home. Missing Middle Housing helps solve the mismatch between the available urban housing stock and shifting demographics combined with the growing demand for walkability.

    Affordability

    In terms of affordability, we tend to think of a dichotomy between single-family detached homes and apartments and townhouses, and people quickly become concerned about increasing density affecting neighborhood character. One way many communities in North America are increasing density while maintaining a streetscape that is compatible with single-family housing types is to incorporate the concept of “missing middle” housing types.

    Missing middle housing can assist in both increasing the number of units built and providing units for a wide variety of price points. This involves allowing a broader diversity of housing types than most zoning bylaws allow today, but that used to be built in many communities historically. Opticos Founder Dan Parolek coined the phrase “missing middle” housing to describe a range of multi-unit or clustered housing types. (See http://opticosdesign.com/ and http://missingmiddlehousing.com/ for more information).

    Because land costs and home size often limit affordability, a classic solution is to aim for greater density and/or smaller lots and/or smaller homes. Missing middle housing types provide more units on less land than traditional single-family homes.

    Missing Middle Housing Types

    The Missing Middle Housing types provide diverse housing options, such as duplexes, fourplexes, and multiplexes. These house-scale buildings fit seamlessly into existing residential neighborhoods and support walkability, locally-serving retail, and public transportation options. They provide solutions along a spectrum of affordability to address the mismatch between the available housing stock and shifting demographics combined with the growing demand for walkability.

    The majority of Missing Middle Housing types have 4-8 units in a building, or 4-8 units on a lot in the case of a cottage cluster. Most Missing Middle building types are 2 to 2.5 stories in height, with the exception of the cottage cluster at 1.5 stories.

    Small Lot Single Family

    A single family dwelling (house) built on of a parcel of land that is smaller in size than a typical single family homes. In Squamish, small lot single family zoning has a minimum parcel size that is 1/3 of the typical single family zone and a minimum width that is half the typical single family zone.
    Some examples of areas in Squamish with this type of housing include Hospital Hill and Amblepath.


    Duplex

    A building which must meet the same size restrictions as a single family dwelling but which contains two separate dwelling units. The dwelling units are often placed side-by-side with a common wall; however, they can also be built front-to-back or stacked vertically, which can enable them to fit on narrower lots. Duplexes may include a backyard and a garage for each unit. Duplexes can be built to have the appearance of single unit dwellings.


    Triplex

    A building which must meet the same size restrictions as a single family home but which contains three dwelling units. The dwelling units can be located side-by-side or may have elements stacked on top of each other. Side-by-side units each typically have ground floor entry; stacked units can have a mix of ground floor entry and shared entries for stacked units. A development permit is required for triplex development; the permit ensures the design of the triplex resembles a single family home. Triplexes may include a rear yard and garages for each unit.


    Fourplex

    A 2-3 story building with four dwelling units, typically arranged with two units on the ground floor and two units above, with shared or individual entries from the street. This housing type can have the appearance of a large-sized single-unit house and may include a rear yard. Depending on the size of the lot, a mix of garages and an outdoor off-street area may be used for parking.


    Multiplex

    A 2 to 3-story building containing between 5 and 12 dwelling units arranged side-by-side and/or stacked, typically with a shared entry from the street. This type can range in appearance from a large single-unit dwelling to a small townhouse and may or not include a backyard. Depending on the size of the lot, a mix of garages and an outdoor off-street area may be used for parking.


    Cottage Cluster

    A group of small, 1- to 1.5-story buildings arranged around a shared courtyard visible from the street. The shared courtyard is an important community-enhancing element and unit entrances generally lead to the courtyard which replaces the function of a backyard. In some examples building can be up to 2 stories. Cottage clusters typically feature outdoor parking rather than garages.


    Courtyard Apartment

    A medium sized, 2- to 3.5-story building consisting of multiple side-by-side and/or stacked dwelling units oriented around a courtyard or series of courtyards. The courtyard replaces the function of a rear yard and is generally open to the street in residential neighborhoods and less open to the street in more urban settings. Each unit is accessed from the courtyard and shared stairs may provide access up to multiple units. Depending on lot size, a mix of garages and outdoor off-street parking may be utilized.


    Townhouse

    A series or cluster of two or more individual dwelling units, attached either vertically or horizontally, where individual access to each unit is from the finished grade of the lot. Entries often face a street or shared outdoor space, which is a requirement. Garages are often located on the ground level with living space located on the second and third story.


    Fee-Simple Row House

    A townhouse style of development with a specific difference in the ownership structure. In a fee-simple row house, there is nothing that is owned by a condo association. The owners own their building and the land under and around their townhouse. Owners of neighbouring units enter a party wall agreement which outlines responsibilities concerning shared walls. Fee-simple row house are different from most existing townhouses in BC where the purchasers are members of a condo association; while these owners own most of their unit outright, the exterior walls, grounds, parking and driveways are owned in common. Consequently, row homes are attractive to buyers who want the ownership autonomy typically associated with single family dwellings at lower price.


    Low-Rise Apartment

    A medium sized, 3-4 story building consisting of apartments, generally accessed from an inner lobby and hallway system. Shared outdoor space must be incorporated into the design. Parking may be locate in a ground floor or underground garage, or in an outdoor parking lot.


    Mixed Use Apartment

    A medium-sized, 3-5-story building consisting of dwelling units above a ground floor space that can accommodate a range of commercial use. The commercial space and residential units typically have separate street entrances. The commercial space typically has a taller ceiling height (min. 10’) and a design appropriate for retail business. Shared outdoor space must be incorporated into the design. Parking may be locate in a ground floor or underground garage, or in an outdoor parking lot.


    Missing Middle and the Vancouver Context

    The missing middle phenomenon is common across North America, including the Metro Vancouver area which primarily has two types of housing: high rises or the single family house. This video delves into the history of Vancouver zoning, provides an explanation of how the city wound up with the current housing structure, and outlines how increased housing choices can benefit community residents.


  • Employment Space Background

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    Squamish Growth will Require More Local Jobs

    Squamish is projected to have nearly 36,000 residents by 2040, averaging a 2.1% net population growth per year. The Squamish workforce is forecasted to almost double as we approach 2040, reaching almost 22,000 workers by 2040. (Source: Statistics Canada population estimates and District of Squamish projections.)

    With 10,000 local jobs today, Squamish would need to create 12,000 new jobs to accommodate the growth locally. (Source: District of Squamish Economic Development Community Dashboard: Local Employment to Total Workforce.)

    More realistically, if we want to maintain the current share of local workers relative to the total workforce (81%), we would need to create an additional 380 local-based jobs per year, for the next 20 years. (Source: District of Squamish Economic Development Community Dashboard: Local Employment to Total Workforce.)

    Re-development and neighbourhood infill can help provide critical infrastructure to support job creation, through the development of more and denser employment space forms that support company creation and growth.

    Population growth

    In the past 5 years, growth in Squamish has been driven by several factors, including migration from other regions in B.C., migration from other provinces, and international immigration. Migration from other provinces accelerated from 2018-2020, while international migration decelerated in that period. (Source: Statistics Canada.)

    Looking forward, growth is almost certain. Federal immigration targets are expected to increase to accommodate Canada’s rapidly-aging population, and Squamish has historically seen significant interest from international immigrants, due to the proximity to Vancouver, and Squamish’s reputation as a top-ranking community for entrepreneurs. (Source: Canadian Federation of Independent Business.) Meanwhile, Squamish’s neighbours in Metro Vancouver foresee a significant population increase by the year 2040. The recent Metro Vancouver 2040 Regional Growth Strategy recognizes that the Lower Mainland is forecasted to welcome 1 million new residents to the region in the next 25 years. (Source: Metro 2040.)

    Workforce needs

    Of the new jobs that will be required to satisfy the growing population, we do anticipate a growing share of home-based and self-employed workers, which could certainly fulfil some of the emerging local job needs. In 2020 there were an estimated 2,656 self-employed individuals working from Squamish, which represents nearly 27% of the local workforce. The proportion of home-based jobs in Squamish is expected to grow following the significant changes to global work behaviors induced by the COVID-19 pandemic, which allowed many companies to hire talent regionally, and even internationally. In recent research conducted by the District of Squamish, many local businesses in the office-based category reported that they would be embracing new ways of working after COVID-19, including more flexible work policies and remote work in the long-term. 2020 research by Harvard Business School suggests that 16% of employers, both large and small, will keep their work-at-home policies long after the pandemic. (Source: Harvard Business School Research & Ideas: How Much Will Remote Work Continue After the Pandemic?) While these remote jobs provide an important opportunity for some of Squamish’s job creation needs, there will continue to be a need for in-person jobs, especially given that many sectors, such as manufacturing, transportation, tourism, and health care, require activities, equipment, and services that are not necessarily compatible with remote work. Emerging automation technologies are likely to influence labour needs as we approach 2040, however it is anticipated that demand will remain for in-person services and experiences. Most likely, a variety of various employment forms will be required, including both in-person and remote jobs.


    Local Businesses Need Employment Space, Affordable Housing, and Workforce Talent to Grow

    Employment Space Access

    • With its unique geography nestled among the Coast Mountains and Howe Sound, Squamish has a limited supply of flat land to accommodate its many diverse employment space needs. A 2020-2021 District of Squamish research study identified that businesses are experiencing growth constraints from a lack of inventory across all employment space types. The list of available space quickly dwindles for businesses when they factor in their size and form requirements, budget, required zoning, and preference for lease versus ownership. Neighbourhood infill that includes mixed use buildings can support the easing of business constraints, by providing more employment space opportunities. (Source: Space Needs Insights for Business, April 2021.)
    • The research also identified that affordability is a key challenge, with the increasing cost of land and space. From 2018-2020, commercial lease rates (for office or retail space) in Squamish rose nearly 43%, from an average of $21.70 to $30.93 per square foot. Increasing the supply of employment space through re-development and neighbourhood infill may help to alleviate pricing pressures. (Source: District of Squamish Economic Development Community Dashboard: Lease Rates and Commercial Space.)
    • Economic and employment space modelling produced by the District in 2020 highlighted potential constraints in several employment space categories. In the short term, demand is forecasted to exceed supply in the office category, which may be satisfied in the long term if large development projects proceed as planned. In the long term, the forecast model indicates that new areas will be needed to accommodate retail space through mixed-use re-development. (Source: Squamish Employment Space Demand Model Report to Council, May 2020.)

    Employee Attraction and Retention

    • As a rural community without regional transit ties to the Lower Mainland, access to qualified workers has consistently been a challenge for local Squamish businesses. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Squamish Chamber of Commerce reported that nearly half (48%) of Squamish businesses find that recruiting and retaining employees is a major challenge (30%), or even the most difficult challenge (18%) of their business. (Source: 2019/2020 Squamish Collective Perspective report from the Squamish Chamber of Commerce.)
    • In addition, the 2019 study found that 27% of businesses had experienced a decline in the availability of workers since the year before, and 32% experienced a decline in the skills of the available labour pool. As a result of these challenges, 24% had to change their business’s growth plans, 15% had to reduce their output, and 15% had to reduce their hours of operation. (Source: 2019/2020 Squamish Collective Perspective report from the Squamish Chamber of Commerce.)
    • Housing affordability was cited as the top factor affecting the availability of workers, with 67% of businesses reporting that it’s a very big factor. Re-development and neighbourhood infill opportunities that can offer the combination of a local supply of workers and affordable housing would directly enable local businesses’ growth and expansion. (Source: 2019/2020 Squamish Collective Perspective report from the Squamish Chamber of Commerce.)

    Generating New Local Jobs Leads to Positive Outcomes

    Neighbourhood infill provides an increased inventory of affordable housing and workspaces, while simultaneously supplying Squamish businesses with qualified workers. Outcomes include:

    • Larger and more diversified tax base
    • Added economic resiliency
    • Reduction in commuting workforce and greenhouse gas emissions
    • Increased local transportation access
    • Access to new services and amenities
    • Increased volunteerism
    • Positive health impacts



  • Infrastructure Background

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    Infrastructure

    Infrastructure costs are an important consideration in local government budgets and are heavily influenced by land use patterns. These costs encompass road maintenance, water infrastructure, sanitary sewer infrastructure, stormwater infrastructure and ongoing operations and maintenance costs. This background document provides an overview of these aspects in the Squamish context as it relates to neighbourhood planning.

    Water Infrastructure

    The District of Squamish water system extracts water from the Ring Creek aquifer which has a capacity of roughly 800 litres/second. On the hottest, driest days of the summer, when we reach our peak water demand, our town draws between 200 and 250 litres/second.

    To convey water from the aquifer to residents, the District has a system of water infrastructure (wells, pumps, reservoirs, pipes, etc). This system is currently the limiting factor for our water supply as we are currently near system capacity during peak times. In the future the water system will have to be expanded to meet additional demand. The District has planned for ongoing community growth and increasing water system demands in the Water Master Plan. Upgrades include expanding the water system capacity through pipe size increases, new reservoirs and additional pumps. The District is actively implementing these upgrades including recent well upgrades, ongoing watermain upgrades and a new planned reservoir in 2022. Water demand from new neighbourhood infill can be met without creating significant new costs to existing taxpayers.

    Sanitary Sewer Infrastructure

    The District of Squamish completed a Liquid Waste Management Plan in 2015 that outlines a plan to meet our liquid waste requirements now and in the future as we contemplate additional community growth. The wastewater treatment plant currently has adequate capacity to meet existing demands and consistently meets our wastewater treatment discharge requirements, as regulated by the Ministry of Environment. Provincial regulations include redundancy requirements for various components of the wastewater treatment plant. The District’s bioreactors currently fall short of redundancy requirements by 17%. This shortfall will be addressed by a wastewater treatment plant expansion which is currently in the design stage; construction will begin in 2022. At the completion of this project the District will meet its redundancy requirements (sections of parallel infrastructure that provide backup in case of equipment failure) and will have the capacity to accommodate anticipated future growth to 2040. These ongoing treatment plant upgrades are partially funded by development through our Development Cost Charge Bylaw.

    In addition, the District of Squamish has completed a Sewer Master Plan that addresses other aspects of the sanitary system such as gravity sewers, pump stations and pressurized mains. The Sewer Master Plan lays out infrastructure upgrades to ensure we can safely convey sewage to the plant as the community grows.

    Stormwater Infrastructure

    Overall, the District’s stormwater infrastructure is meeting the needs of the community and, aside from some localized areas, does not experience significant drainage issues on a regular basis. Staff are currently working on a stormwater management plan for the area south of the Mamquam River. In 2022 staff will be working on a stormwater management plan for Brackendale and the Garibaldi Estates.

    Road Infrastructure

    Roads also require ongoing maintenance including snow plowing, applying anti-icing bring, patching and eventual re-paving. Concentrating development within infill areas reduces the total length of roads that require maintenance while adding additional tax revenue. This results in lower costs per capita as compared with building new developments in currently undeveloped areas of the community.

    Ongoing Maintenance and Replacement

    In new developments, infrastructure is generally installed by the developer, which aligns with the District’s intention that ‘development should pay for itself’. In contrast, replacement of existing infrastructure at end-of-life is the responsibility of the District. The major labour and equipment costs in end-of-life replacement generally involve excavation, dewatering and road resurfacing. The incremental cost of increasing infrastructure size (such as installing a 200mm pipe rather than a 250mm pipe) accounts for a relatively small amount (less than 10%) of the total cost for a given project. As such, increasing the number of dwellings serviced by existing infrastructure (rather than installing new infrastructure to other areas of the community) through neighbourhood infill is an important method to reduce the per person tax burden of infrastructure maintenance.

    From an asset management perspective, an additional method of ensuring efficient use of infrastructure is to focus on land use planning that is based on a consolidated infrastructure system. Shorter stretches of infrastructure are significantly more efficient and cost effective than longer stretches. The longer the infrastructure system, the more maintenance issues will arise over time resulting in higher costs. This is an important intention behind establishing a growth management boundary in the current OCP.

    Cost of City Infrastructure and Services: Halifax

    In addition to infrastructure costs, other municipal services are also generally more efficient and cost effective to provide in communities with higher densities. In 2015, the Canadian environmental think tank, Sustainable Prosperity, conducted analysis to compare the costs of municipal infrastructure and services for a variety of development patterns, ranging from rural to urban, for Halifax Regional Municipality in Nova Scotia. While the costs do not directly relate to the Squamish context, the analysis does provide an interesting perspective on the magnitude of costs between different development patterns.

    In their analysis, low density development (between 2.2 and 10.4 people/acre) costs local government twice as much as mid to high density development (between 36 and 92 people/acre).

    When examining these densities in relation to the Garibaldi Estates neighbourhood based on the 2016 census numbers, the VLA lands, which encompass 120 acres, are populated at roughly 5 people per acre, equivalent to low density housing in the Halifax analysis. In comparison, there are 12 properties in the Garibaldi Estates Neighbourhood that support missing middle housing forms (duplexes, triplexes, rowhouses, townhouses and apartments) which encompass 12.3 acres. The average density of these 12 properties is roughly 50 people per acre, equivalent to somewhere between mid and high density in the Halifax analysis. In the Halifax report, the annual cost of providing infrastructure and services roughly doubles moving from the low density development pattern to the mid and high density pattern. While the specific costs identified in the report will not be relevant to the Squamish scenario, the example does provide insight into how increased density can significantly reduce local government costs and property taxes.

    For more information about the Halifax analysis please visit this link:
    https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2015/03/Halifax-data.pdf

    Servicing Suburban Expansion in Ottawa

    Similar results were identified through analysis of servicing costs in Ottawa.

    "The city had Hemson Consulting Ltd. review a major study it had done and update some numbers from 2012 to reflect how city costs and tax bills have changed over nine years.

    Hemson found it now costs the City of Ottawa $465 per person each year to serve new low-density homes built on undeveloped land, over and above what it receives from property taxes and water bills. That's up $56 from eight years ago.

    On the other hand, high-density infill development, such as apartment buildings, pays for itself and leaves the city with an extra $606 per capita each year, a financial benefit that has grown by $151."

    For more information about the Ottawa analysis please visit this link:
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/urban-expansion-costs-menard-memo-1.6193429

  • Transportation Background

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    by jfletcher,

    How people get around their neighborhood and community is one of the most vital considerations when starting a neighbourhood planning process. How are people getting to services? Can residents easily walk or bike to a doctor’s office or to get groceries? How are our roads functioning? This background document provides an overview of the existing transportation conditions observed by staff in the Garibaldi Estates.

    Existing Transportation

    Roads

    The Garibaldi Estates is served by one arterial road: Highway 99, two major collectors: Mamquam Road, Garibaldi Way, one minor collector: Tantalus Road. Most of these roads have transit stops, and parking is generally informal, if not limited. The District has issued a request for proposals as part of this project to better understand shortcomings and opportunities, specifically as it relates to the Mamquam Road/Highway 99 intersection, which see heavy traffic.

    The majority of roads in the estates are rural by nature: gravel shoulders, many driveways, and limited stop signs/crossing opportunities, which can encourage higher speeds and less pedestrian travel.

    Sidewalks

    Staff note that the Estates tends to have quite long streets, with very few sidewalks, which are primarily located on Diamond Road and Tantalus Road. Because of the length of the streets, many walks to services (parks, grocery, etc.) are upwards of 1,000m – or more than 10minutes of walking. Limited north-south sidewalk opportunities exist. This makes for limited opportunities for safe walking. Garibaldi Way, Mamquam Road, and Diamond Head Road have all been identified as locations for sidewalks and/or pedestrian improvements in the medium term in the District’s Active Transportation Plan.

    Bike Lanes

    The Estates is partially served by bicycle infrastructure in the form of bike lanes on portions of Garibaldi Way, the corridor trail, Tantalus Road north, and Mamquam Road. The District’s Active Transportation Plan identifies Garibaldi Way, Mamquam Road, Diamond Road and Diamond Head Road as priority areas for improved bicycle infrastructure.

    Transit

    The Estates are primarily served by two bus routes: the #2 and the #9, while #4 does serve a portion of the area. There are bus stops nearly every 400m; however, the Ridgeway/south Skyline/Park Crescent area appears to be upwards of 600m away from the nearest stop.

    Core Transit Network & Density

    Previously staff have engaged with BC Transit to discuss land use planning options that would support enhanced bus service and increased ridership (also known as transit mode share). A key result from these discussions was the importance of developing a strong Core Transit Network that provided 15 minute service frequency. One of the critical metrics to achieve this level of services is the density of jobs and residents within a 400 m walk of the bus stops along the core transit network. A density of 3,500 residents and jobs/km2 is considered by BC Transit to be an appropriate minimum density to support 15 minutes frequency service along a core transit network. Resident and job density above this threshold further supports the viability of frequent transit. Consequently, higher density development along the core transit network could support more frequent transit and provide additional incentives for mode shift in the community. This aligns with a key goal from the District of Squamish Community Climate Action Plan:

    Big Move #2: Shift Beyond the Car

    Support and incentivize high density infill development along the core transit networks, around neighbourhood nodes and in mixed use areas through additional housing forms (plexes, row housing, suites), density bonuses, and reductions in parking requirements.


    District of Squamish Transit System




  • Parks, Institutions, and Neighbourhood Services Background

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    by jfletcher,

    Institutions + Park Space

    Institutions and park space are important characteristics of a neighbourhood. A neighbourhood that is well served by a range of services (think doctor’s offices, grocery stores, offices, schools, daycares, parks, etc.) is a desirable goal. By reducing the reliance on a vehicle to complete basic tasks, we can reduce our carbon footprint, increase individual health by choosing alternative transportation forms where possible, and support a strong local economy.

    Figure 1. All parcels zoned P-2 (District Assembly) or P-3 (Park and Public Use)

    Services

    Staff noted in their survey of the Estates that there appears to be few opportunities for childcare (4 locations) and doctor’s offices, while there appears to many dental offices in the area. The area is served by three grocery stores (one large, two small), and many restaurants. There are several fitness opportunities nearby, and many opportunities for religious participation.

    Table 1. Estimated access rate to childcare by neighbourhood, from the District of Squamish’s2020 Childcare Access PlanParks

    The Estates contains two neighborhood parks (Willow Park and Pat Goode Park), two undeveloped parks (Paco road and Bill’s Place) and two unofficial parks (Squamish Golf Course and Mamquam School Park). The southernmost area of the Estates are identified as needing a new Neighbourhood Park, as it is underserved by both park space and playground space.

    Table 2. Inventory of Parks in the Garibaldi Estates

    Park Name

    Park Classification

    Location

    Description

    Size

    Willow Park

    Neighbourhood Park

    1803 Willow Crescent

    Playground, Dog Park

    0.23ha

    Pat Goode Park

    Neighbourhood Park

    40422 Cheakamus Way

    Playground, Open Space

    1.08ha

    Bills Place Park

    Environmental + Drainage

    40178 Bill’s Place

    Undeveloped

    0.29ha

    Dedicated Park (Paco)

    Environmental + Drainage

    Behind Paco Road

    Undeveloped


    Park Crescent (Coho Park)

    Neighbourhood Park

    Park Cres

    Hiking/Biking

    1.14ha

    Mamquam School Park

    Unofficial Park

    Mamquam School

    Playground, Field


    Squamish Golf Course

    Unofficial Park


    Golf, trails



    Figure 2. Map of Playground Service Areas in the Garibaldi Estates, from the 2012 District of Squamish Parks and Recreation Master Plan.


Page last updated: 17 May 2022, 11:56 AM