Improving Road Safety

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Consultation has concluded


The Big Question:

What is the “just right zone” between speed and safety?


The Project:

The District of Squamish is committed to improving road safety for all road users. Improving safety on our roads supports a variety of shared community values:

  • An equitable transportation network that meets the needs of all users, regardless of age or income.

  • Commuter options that prioritize sustainable transportation, recreation and fitness.

  • Improved neighbourhood connectivity by encouraging more walking and cycling.

Community input received through the ongoing Transportation Master Plan process has indicated community interest in reducing vehicle speeds where pedestrians, especially school children, walk, ride, and roll. Input indicated particular concern for pedestrian safety where there are no sidewalks available. This input has informed the development of a series of options to achieve safer roads:

  1. Speed Limit Reductions – The District is considering options to reduce posted speed limits on municipal roads in Squamish to improve road safety. Options may include District-wide, area-specific, or street-/corridor-specific speed reductions.

  1. Traffic Calming Traffic calming is a method to slow travelled speeds and lower traffic volumes. Traffic calming typically involves changing the physical design of a roadway such as adding speed humps, traffic diversion, medians, or other features. The District is updating its Traffic Calming Policy to provide greater clarity on what types of traffic calming measures are considered and prioritized.

  1. Micro Mobility Devices The popularity of micro mobility devices (e.g. e-bikes or e-scooters) continues to grow, and speeds on multi-use commuter trails are an important consideration. The District will undertake a study to understand how the use of micro mobility devices can be regulated and enforced on roads and commuter trails. This study does not include recreational trails.

Of the three options above, we are seeking public input specifically on #1 (Speed Limit Reductions) over the coming weeks. Please read on to get involved and consider contributing to this important discussion.

Why consider speed limit reductions?

Numerous studies by third parties have been conducted to determine the relationship between vehicle speed at impact and pedestrian and cyclist injuries and casualties. The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) City Limits report states that vehicle speed at the time of impact is directly correlated to whether a person will live or die. Data underlying this report was converted to kilometres per hour which results in the following statistics:

A pedestrian hit by a vehicle travelling at 50 kilometres per hour has a 50% chance of severe injury or death, at 40 kilometres per hour that number drops to 30%, and at 30 kilometres per hour it drops to 15%.


Community Input #1 - mapping exercise (in-person option also available)

The District is seeking feedback from residents of all ages, neighbourhoods and transportation preferences (pedestrians - including those walking to/from and waiting at transit stops, cyclists, micro mobility users, and drivers) to understand the areas of concern related to traffic speeds. We want to understand the trade-offs and impacts for exploring reduced speed limits on municipal roads. Your input, concerns, community perspective, and lived experience is extremely valuable; and your participation will allow our team to include your input as we consider the various approaches to reducing speeds.

The community is being asked to share locations where speed is a concern through an online mapping tool. The tool can be found below.

Community input will help shape the approach to establishing speed limits in Squamish.

  • The online mapping tool is open through Monday, April 8 on letstalksquamish.ca/speedlimits.

  • Residents are asked to identify locations where vehicle speed is a concern.

  • The online mapping tool is easy to use, and identifying an area of concern takes approximately 30 seconds per location.

Residents are also invited to The 55 Activity Centre to add a comment to a physical map. Staff will be available for questions on Thursday March 21 from noon to 2pm. The map will remain posted through April 8 so residents can stop by and add a comment.

The results of both digital and in-person feedback, along with speed limit reduction options and scenarios for discussion and feedback, will be shared with the community this spring.

This stage of input (through the mapping tool) closed on April 8. Stay tuned for what we heard, and further opportunities for input once the data has been compiled.



The Big Question:

What is the “just right zone” between speed and safety?


The Project:

The District of Squamish is committed to improving road safety for all road users. Improving safety on our roads supports a variety of shared community values:

  • An equitable transportation network that meets the needs of all users, regardless of age or income.

  • Commuter options that prioritize sustainable transportation, recreation and fitness.

  • Improved neighbourhood connectivity by encouraging more walking and cycling.

Community input received through the ongoing Transportation Master Plan process has indicated community interest in reducing vehicle speeds where pedestrians, especially school children, walk, ride, and roll. Input indicated particular concern for pedestrian safety where there are no sidewalks available. This input has informed the development of a series of options to achieve safer roads:

  1. Speed Limit Reductions – The District is considering options to reduce posted speed limits on municipal roads in Squamish to improve road safety. Options may include District-wide, area-specific, or street-/corridor-specific speed reductions.

  1. Traffic Calming Traffic calming is a method to slow travelled speeds and lower traffic volumes. Traffic calming typically involves changing the physical design of a roadway such as adding speed humps, traffic diversion, medians, or other features. The District is updating its Traffic Calming Policy to provide greater clarity on what types of traffic calming measures are considered and prioritized.

  1. Micro Mobility Devices The popularity of micro mobility devices (e.g. e-bikes or e-scooters) continues to grow, and speeds on multi-use commuter trails are an important consideration. The District will undertake a study to understand how the use of micro mobility devices can be regulated and enforced on roads and commuter trails. This study does not include recreational trails.

Of the three options above, we are seeking public input specifically on #1 (Speed Limit Reductions) over the coming weeks. Please read on to get involved and consider contributing to this important discussion.

Why consider speed limit reductions?

Numerous studies by third parties have been conducted to determine the relationship between vehicle speed at impact and pedestrian and cyclist injuries and casualties. The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) City Limits report states that vehicle speed at the time of impact is directly correlated to whether a person will live or die. Data underlying this report was converted to kilometres per hour which results in the following statistics:

A pedestrian hit by a vehicle travelling at 50 kilometres per hour has a 50% chance of severe injury or death, at 40 kilometres per hour that number drops to 30%, and at 30 kilometres per hour it drops to 15%.


Community Input #1 - mapping exercise (in-person option also available)

The District is seeking feedback from residents of all ages, neighbourhoods and transportation preferences (pedestrians - including those walking to/from and waiting at transit stops, cyclists, micro mobility users, and drivers) to understand the areas of concern related to traffic speeds. We want to understand the trade-offs and impacts for exploring reduced speed limits on municipal roads. Your input, concerns, community perspective, and lived experience is extremely valuable; and your participation will allow our team to include your input as we consider the various approaches to reducing speeds.

The community is being asked to share locations where speed is a concern through an online mapping tool. The tool can be found below.

Community input will help shape the approach to establishing speed limits in Squamish.

  • The online mapping tool is open through Monday, April 8 on letstalksquamish.ca/speedlimits.

  • Residents are asked to identify locations where vehicle speed is a concern.

  • The online mapping tool is easy to use, and identifying an area of concern takes approximately 30 seconds per location.

Residents are also invited to The 55 Activity Centre to add a comment to a physical map. Staff will be available for questions on Thursday March 21 from noon to 2pm. The map will remain posted through April 8 so residents can stop by and add a comment.

The results of both digital and in-person feedback, along with speed limit reduction options and scenarios for discussion and feedback, will be shared with the community this spring.

This stage of input (through the mapping tool) closed on April 8. Stay tuned for what we heard, and further opportunities for input once the data has been compiled.


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Please share your locations of concerns related to traffic speeds

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